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JULY
4th Week of July - Living History at Silver Reef 
Saturday, July 28, 2018 - 10:00 am
  • Volunteers in Old West attire will be strolling the streets of Silver Reef.  Mon., Thu., Fri. & Sat. during the 4th week every month. 
  • Wild West Shootouts with Lawmen and the Muddy River Gang are on Saturday July 28, 2018.    Shootouts at 1pm and 3pm. 
  • Renowned western artist Jerry Anderson's Sculpture Studio will be open to guests 10am-5pm on  Saturday July 28, 2018. His studio is across the street from the museum grounds.
Cottonwood Canal Water 1879-1898
Lecture by Richard Kohler at the Cosmopolitan
Suggested Donation: $4.00 ea. Donation includes Silver Reef Museum admission and the Mine Exhibit tour. Registration is suggested due to limited space so please register online at:  https://tinyurl.com/CottonwoodSpringsWater
Or call 435.879.2254
    After the Temple was completed in 1877, St. George leaders anticipated a population boom. They knew that a new source of water was needed. They saw the springs at the base of the Pine View Mountains some 18 miles away, and in 1879 recruited volunteers (shareholders) began surveys, plans and cost estimates.
    Local Shivwits tribe leaders told the surveyors that the path selected was “uphill” and the water would run “backwards” if they persisted. Even before the canal’s completion. They began work on a dam above St. George where the canal’s water could be stored. But, ... it never was. They called it “Hernia Dam”. The open canal was finally piped with the help of the Civilian Conservation Corps boys in 1934.
    Collaboration among many church, civic and federal government officials was absolutely necessary to complete this daunting feat. Drinking water from this source still serves a large portion of downtown St. George to this day.
Richard R. Kohler is an architect/historian, currently serving as president of the Washington County Historical Society. He received a Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering from the
University of Utah and a Master of Architecture from the University of Hawaii, completing postgraduate studies at Harvard University. His most recent book "The Town Lot: A Little Piece of Zion", was published in 2013. Previously, "St. George: Outpost of Civilization", was published in 2011 celebrating the sesquicentennial of the founding of St. George by Mormon Colonists in 1861. Richard Kohler’s architectural practice (www.kohler-architecture.com) is geographically and technically diverse ranging from Park City, St. George, Las Vegas and San Diego.
About the Presenter: Richard Kohler